REFRACTIVE
CONDITIONS

Have you ever wondered what it means to be near-sighted or farsighted or what astigmatism is and why it blurs your vision? Read below for some of the most common visual issues and how they can impact your best possible vision!

MYOPIA

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MYOPIA

Nearsightedness

A vision condition in which people can see close objects clearly, but objects farther away appear blurred. Most individuals with myopia inherit it, but it may be affected by how a person uses their eyes. Individuals who spend a lot of time reading, working at a computer, or doing other close work may be more likely to develop myopia. Myopia can also temporarily be caused by uncontrolled diabetes (high blood sugar).

HYPEROPIA

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HYPEROPIA

Farsightedness

A vision condition in which distant objects are usually seen more clearly than close ones. It is not just a part of the aging of the lens, which occurs with presbyopia, which begins in your early 40's. Common signs of hyperopia include difficulty concentrating and maintaining a clear focus on near objects, eye strain, fatigue and/or headaches after close work, aching or burning eyes, and irritability or nervousness after sustained concentration.

ASTIGMATISM

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ASTIGMATISM

Vision 

Distortion

A distortion of the front surface of the eye known as the cornea, is the most common cause of astigmatism. Most people think of it as curved like a football or an egg. Light is not able to enter the eye in one focused beam, so that is why lights and images are seen as starbursts, slanted, etc. Glasses or contacts are required to pull all of those light beams into one, sharp, focused beam for clear vision.

PRESBYOPIA

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PRESBYOPIA

Trouble Reading

Over 40

Presbyopia is a vision condition where the crystalline lens inside of the eye begins to become tougher. The muscles in the eye are not able to manipulate the lens as it needs to be in order to focus on things up close. When this happens, glasses or contacts are needed to provide the additional focus power that is lost.

DIPLOPIA

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DIPLOPIA

Double

Vision

Double vision can occur for many reasons. Congenital conditions such as strabismus or amblyopia are common as well as acute conditions such as stroke or traumatic brain injury. Double vision can be horizontal or vertical. Either one are not normal. While surgery can sometimes correct these issues and allow a person to see one image, many times a special type of lens called a prism is required to help the brain see one image.

AMBLYOPIA

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AMBLYOPIA

Lazy

Eye

Although there are many reasons why one eye may see better than another, with amblyopia, one eye sees better than the other because of a neural development issue between the eye and the brain. Because the brain doesn't receive the same stimulation from both eyes, it will favor the "good" eye. The causes the vision to continue to deteriorate in the "bad" eye. This is when an eye turn or a "wandering" eye may be observed. Very early diagnosis and intervention is crucial in order to improve and/or retain vision in the "bad" eye.

STRABISMUS

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STRABISMUS

Eye

Misalignment

Strabismus is an eye disorder where the eyes do not line up in the same direction. The eye can be misaligned in one or more combinations. The condition can be congenital, but can also be brought on by traumatic brain injuries, stroke and optic nerve damage or disease. Surgery can be performed to help realign the eyes, as well as non-surgical interventions such as patching and glasses.